News & Information

Is There One Best Path in Life?


By Deepak Chopra, MD

Without using the term, everyone has marked out a path in life–a path can be defined as a road map that guides you to a goal. Because every day presents some kind of goal, however small, being on a path is inevitable. It doesn’t have to be a conscious choice. Yet at a certain point it dawns on most people that they have larger goals, even lifetime goals, that require long-term planning. At this point choosing a path does become a conscious decision.

 

On the surface, it would appear that life presents many paths, because so many goals present themselves: finding the right partner, raising a family, settling on a career, pursuing success, earning more money, saving a nest egg for retirement. These are socially shared goals, to which more can be added, such as finding God or writing a novel. But if you look deeper, everything on this list boils down to one path only.

 

This is the path of desire, which is the most natural path, since we all have desires. The impetus that keeps people on the path of desire is universal but also logical. If you want to eat breakfast, make friends, do something you enjoy, or have any other everyday desire, it’s logical that expanding your desires and following a bigger dream should serve as a reliable path in life. In fact, because 99% of the human race follows the path of desire, this should prove how defective it is. The problems of poverty, crime, war, hunger, disease, and mental anguish haven’t been solved around the world, and one or more of these problems reaches into everyone’s life.

 

The irony of turning desire into a path is that no one can validate that desire itself is positive. Shattered dreams are at least as common as dreams fulfilled. Psychological studies show that human beings are very bad predictors of what will make them happy. A young woman who deeply desires to have a child will confront the fact that being a new mother is one of the most stressful times of life for many women. Having more money increases happiness up to a certain threshold when you feel financially secure, after which having more money has diminishing returns. Unchecked impulses are a major aspect of things like the obesity epidemic, huge credit card debt, and criminal behavior–in a word, we desire lots of things that are self-defeating.

 

If there is a best path in life, the path of desire isn’t it. But how do you get off this path, which is so ingrained and occupies every waking hour from infancy onward? One insight is that desire comes from a shallow source. A restless mind leads to restless desires, which plays a major part in the pattern of endless desires that never seem to reach inner fulfillment even when the outer goal has been attained. If this is true, then going deeper into the mind to find a place of inner fulfillment opens up another path.

 

For just this reason millions of people have started to meditate and do yoga, and for the most part they discover the satisfaction of stepping out of the demands of desire. But still this doesn’t constitute a new path; it is more like a glimpse of a new path.  After meditation and yoga class come to an end, it’s back onto the treadmill of desire. Seeing the downside of the path of desire doesn’t free you from the problems created by desire. Since these problems are mixed in with the pleasure and delight of desire, countless people remain confused, conflicted, and at a loss.

 

The basis for confusion comes down to either/or thinking. There’s a time-honored belief that the worldly life and the spiritual life exist as opposites, the worldly life being defined by desires and the spiritual life by selfless abstention.  Yet even if you could persuade yourself that you are renouncing desire, that itself is a desire–you still want to be happy and fulfilled, even though your attitude is higher and holier than people who pursue happiness by taking a vacation in Las Vegas or Disney World.

 

The best path in life begins by abolishing the separation between worldly and spiritual aspirations. Such a path allows desire to play out its natural course without running wild, while bringing experiences of love, joy, truth, beauty, divine presence, or whatever else you consider higher and spiritual. In other words, the best path in life should aim for the goal of wholeness. Being human is complete and whole when we are not self-divided by conflict, confusion, frustration, and the constant demands that pull us in opposite directions.

 

To be self-divided is the product of blindly accepting that your desires will get you where you want to be. Even when one cherished goal is attained, that still leaves untold potential that lies unfulfilled. The only way to lead a whole and complete life is to be whole and complete yourself. This, finally, is the best path in life, which can be called for the sake of simplicity the path of the self. I’m not endorsing selfishness and egotism. The path of the self is a lifelong quest to discover who you are, knitting together the glimpses of fulfillment that occur in everyone’s life.

 

The great discoveries that dawn on this path are “I am enough. Being here is fulfilling. Existence unfolds inner potential without end.” Being human isn’t complete without these discoveries, and they cannot be found through desire. To know that you are enough, and that existence will unfold your inner potential transforms daily life in profound ways. But transformation cannot be a goal. It is the fruit of being on the path of the self. All such discoveries happen spontaneously, on their own time schedule, under the guidance of an intelligence that transcends the everyday thinking mind.

 

The path of the self has always been open to everyone, and meditation takes you through the door. Then it is necessary to have a vision and a long-term intention, in this case, to find your true self. Along the way choices have to be made about your beliefs, guiding principles, personal relationships, and so on–but these are secondary. What is held before you every day is finding the way out of self-doubt, confusion, inner conflict, and divisive desires that keep you entangled in a state of separation. The divided self is easy to spot, and its consequences litter our lives. So there’s real work to be done on the path of the self, only it is the effortless work of going inside, adopting the next step of self-awareness, and identifying with a level of mind deeper than the restless, superficial mind.  When you see the value of this project, you have taken the important first step that brings the path of the self into view.

 

Deepak Chopra MD, FACP, founder of The Chopra Foundation and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, is a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation, and is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Chopra is the author of more than 85 books translated into over 43 languages, including numerous New York Times bestsellers. His latest books are The Healing Self co-authored with Rudy Tanzi, Ph.D. and Quantum Healing (Revised and Updated): Exploring the Frontiers of Mind/Body Medicine.  www.deepakchopra.com

MORE

Looking Deep into the Problem of Fear


By Deepak Chopra, MD

Everyday life proceeds along no matter how terrible circumstances become. But when traumatic events occur, everyday life doesn’t solve them. Time alone cannot heal deep wounds. One after-effect of having something bad happen, whether it is the loss of a loved one, a bitter divorce, the outbreak of war, or being the victim of a crime, is anxiety. Millions of people suffer from anxiety and seek help from the billion-dollar market for tranquilizers or, less legitimately, opioids.

Anxiety often feels mysterious to those who suffer from it. Instead of being linked to a cause, such as being anxious to get to work on time when your car dies in traffic, modern anxiety is often free-floating. It’s like a chronic condition that needs no immediate cause or is triggered by tiny causes that normally don’t justify a feeling of anxiety.

To get at anxiety, there has to be an understanding of fear, because anxiety is residual fear. Despite the seemingly normal, untroubled activities of everyday life, something deeper down is generating the response of fear. So what is the role of fear as a human emotion? There is more than one function that fear plays, as follows:

Physical fear is born of a physical threat. It crosses over into psychological fear when the actual threat is gone but its effects linger. An abusive parent, for example, feels like a physical threat to a child–and sometimes is one. Leaving home at 17 or 18 removes the physical threat, but still the effects will linger psychologically. In this case, that fear of physical threat has become useless, a false protection against an imaginary bogeyman. Psychologists point out that fear isn’t entirely negative. It can be part of the fight-or-flight mechanism embedded in the lower brain, a response inherited from our remote ancestors to defend themselves from danger.

Yet in modern life the actual uses of fear are overwhelmed by useless psychological fear that hampers and often cripples people’s lives. Lingering, useless fear is the result of impressions made in the past that turned into conditioning. Even when you survive a trauma, the impression it leaves creates new, repeated trauma–that’s the whole point of PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, which traumatizes soldiers back home because of the impressions left by war.

To get at the cause of anxiety, we can say that PTSD applies in small and large ways to everything we are afraid us. Something had to make us afraid in the first place, and then the fear was kept alive by lingering impressions. The memory of fear is mysterious, because all memory is mysterious. Yet it is enough to say that old traumas affect mind, brain, and body. Fear cannot be undone without reaching the whole bodymind.

There are many therapies and drugs that come into play when dealing with anxiety, but ultimately, we need to know how psychological fear ever got created in the first place. If you were not in the habit of fear, bad things would come and go without leaving a lasting impression. The viewpoint that seems most valid to me is that all fears are generated by a single primal fear. This single fear made an inescapable impression, generating the habit of fear, and afterwards all the other miscellaneous fears latched on to the habit.

What constitutes a primal fear? “Primal” means that it is built into the very state of being human. Does this imply that simply by being human we must be afraid, without remedy or escape? No–our primal fear runs very deep, but not as deep as that. Our primal fear is that we are alone, unsafe, disconnected from Nature, prey to random harm, and fated to suffer traumas. This describes the state of separation, and there is no better or deeper explanation of where fear was born. it was born of separation.

If this is true, then the solution to fear of the lingering, psychological post-traumatic kind is to expose separation as an illusion. Getting out of separation is usually put in spiritual terms, but I feel that any category is too limiting and ultimately artificial. Either we are destined to be in the state of separation or we can wake up and see that separation is an illusion. It’s a matter of consciousness, not spirit. “Spirit” is a convenient tag for higher consciousness or expanded consciousness. The important thing, the real thing, is to wake up.

Only when you wake up, realize that you are not separate, and suddenly know the difference between reality and illusion does fear go away–indeed, all suffering goes away, since suffering was created by the state of separation too. Fear and suffering are lingering psychological reactions to feeling alone and threatened by our existence. If being human was an existential threat, we are doomed. But that’s the illusion. Being human is a state of infinite potential because existence contains infinite possibilities. Waking up to the infinite cures fear and suffering. There’s more to say about how to reach the state of waking up, but the bottom line is that fear is born of separation. Once a person discovers this truth and begins to take it to heart, the end of fear becomes possible.

Deepak Chopra MD, FACP, founder of The Chopra Foundation and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, is a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation, and is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Chopra is the author of more than 85 books translated into over 43 languages, including numerous New York Times bestsellers. His latest books are The Healing Self co-authored with Rudy Tanzi, Ph.D. and Quantum Healing (Revised and Updated): Exploring the Frontiers of Mind/Body Medicine.  www.deepakchopra.com 

MORE

How Real Is the Soul?

 

By Deepak Chopra, MD

Depending on which polls you consult, more than half of Americans and up to 67% believe that a person’s soul goes to heaven or hell after death. This belief seems unusually strong considering that more and more Americans no longer identify with a fixed religion. “I’m not religious, but I’m spiritual” has become a common sentiment, and yet the idea of the soul continues to hold its place.  One might even say it outstrips God as a matter of belief.

 

Look at how deeply embedded the word “soul” is in our culture, from soul music to soul searching. Once a word takes hold, so does the concept it represents. To a pure rationalist, there’s no reason to say that the gospels sung in African American churches are more soulful than a Beethoven symphony. When someone searches his soul, the psychological reality is that he is usually just consulting his conscience or weighing issues of right and wrong that came from childhood upbringing.

 

There is a good possibility in fact, that the soul is a deeply rooted concept rather than a reality–militant atheists would go even further and describe the soul as pure superstition. At the very least, if you no longer abide by religious doctrine, discovering the reality of the soul means that you must move from belief to experience. The soul, when stripped to its essence, is an experience that transcends everyday life; it goes beyond reason and logic; it is validated not by facts in evidence but by direct contact. Lots of things, starting with our emotions, are validated the same way. If you haven’t experienced anger or love, you know these emotions only abstractly and from the outside.

 

The tricky part, so far as the soul is concerned, is transcendence. Do we actually go beyond daily life and ordinary experience to visit another, higher dimension? Doubts on this score abound, which is why most people try to bring the soul down to earth, beginning with the words “my soul.” To say “I have a soul” brings everything down to a personal level, and yet this is the very thing that deprives the soul of any chance to be real. “I have a bank account” and “I have a job” implies possession, and the soul, not being a thing, cannot be possessed. “I have a family” and “I have a religion” implies identification, helping to strengthen and define who you think you are. Thinking you are your soul can’t work the same way, however, unless you lived at the soul level, if not all the time, at least enough of the time that it feels like you.

 

Making the shift from belief to reality can never happen by accepting second-hand opinions and mental concepts. These are habits that reinforce themselves without actually getting anywhere. Your belief in the soul probably has little or no effect on your daily life, focused as you are on the demands of the modern secular world.  This makes belief in the soul a cheap commodity, something we can casually hold on to without being forced to test it. It’s safe to say that for millions of people, the testing time won’t arrive until they die, when supposedly you will discover if a soul goes to heaven or hell.

 

Far better to make the testing time today, or at least begin the journey that will validate the soul or do something else with it.  by “something else” I mean that on the journey of expanding your own awareness, the soul undergoes a transformation. “My” soul exists only when the concept of I” is limited, confined to a span of time between birth and death and enclosed within a physical body destined to age and perish. It is because we identify with this limited “I” that the dilemma of the soul arises. When you change your identification, the soul shrinks in significance.

 

Rather than standing for the precious divine essence inside you, the soul becomes not much more than a verbal tag. The tag was needed in the mental setup of opposites that runs daily life. Religions codify a special set of opposites: good and evil, God and Satan, Heaven and Hell, etc. All these verbal tags are then set in dramatic motion as a kind of war or spiritual combat for the souls of humans. When someone accepts this special set of religious tags, they stand for something real; by stepping away from them, this reality becomes shaky and eventually dissipates.

 

Yet it seems that one particular opposite lingers everywhere that religion has reached: mortal and immortal. This is the essence of the spiritual mystery, in that this mortal body contrasts with the immortal soul. In the actual experience of expanded consciousness, the duality of mortal and immortal is meaningless. Existence is whole, complete, undivided, having no before or after, no place to arrive at or leave. The experience of existence at its most basic, when a person confronts the state of pure consciousness, is the experience of waking up.

 

Waking up resolves most spiritual questions by revealing that they don’t actually have much, if any, meaning. For example, if existence is one and God is one, the two merge, and there is no reason to create a mysterious category for a supreme divine Creator. In the same way, all the attributes we hope to find in the soul, most especially our hope of being immortal, are embedded in existence itself. Once you consciously awaken to this reality, every dilemma in the state of duality, or opposites, ceases to have any meaning.

 

Belief in the soul, then, is a hopeful state that turns out to be two-edged. Hope keeps a cherished possibility open while at the same time blocking the way forward.  Being stuck in your faith is like being stuck in anything; it’s static. It’s truly said that the spiritual journey consists of eliminating all illusions, because once every illusion is gone, what remains must be real.  In reality consciousness is the source of everything in existence, unfolding in modes of knowing and experience that are modes of consciousness at play. The soul as a human concept is what it is–a tag for experiencing the transcendent. But no tag is as valuable as experiencing the transcendent itself, which is the goal of waking up.

 

Deepak Chopra MD, FACP, founder of The Chopra Foundation and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, is a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation, and is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Chopra is the author of more than 85 books translated into over 43 languages, including numerous New York Times bestsellers. His latest books are The Healing Self co-authored with Rudy Tanzi, Ph.D. and Quantum Healing (Revised and Updated): Exploring the Frontiers of Mind/Body Medicine.  www.deepakchopra.com

MORE

Why Did We Create God

By Deepak Chopra, MD

There is no denying that the different versions of God in world religions has led to historical violence and conflict, which humanitarians have tried to end by saying that there is only one God, implying that such conflicts are pointless. But is there only one God? The conflicting versions of God all attempt to grasp God in reality, so every version actually is God for that religion.

 

Atheists claim that all of these versions are fictional to begin with, but this misses the point. Human beings have experienced the spiritual dimension of life for as long as history can tell. The need for God grew out of the same need as modern science: to explain a fundamental aspect of Nature. The problem is that there is a gap between this need for explanations and the answers arrived at.

 

In this gap creativity went to work. The gods and God are human creations, constructs of the mind. Faced with unanswerable dilemmas the human mind went to work to fashion a supernatural dimension presided over by a ruler, or rulers, who stand in for rulers here on Earth, being human, emotional, unpredictable, beautiful, terrible, merciful, vengeful–pick any human trait and you can match it to some version of God worshipped now or in the past. The rational God of Thomas Jefferson’s enlightened God is a projection of his ideal human portrayed on a superhuman scale, just as Jehovah, the complete opposite of Jefferson’s God, was an idealized projection by ancient rabbis.

 

The need to create God in our own image is undeniable, and warring faiths were probably inevitable since antagonistic versions of God represented values worth fighting and dying for. Now the ground has shifted, however. The need to keep on creating God has waned drastically. There are unlikely to be new world religions armed with the power and might of the old ones. About the only God anyone wants in a modern secular society is either harmless, antiquated, and benign–like a fairy-tale grandfather–or else totally abstract, which is why some people defend evolution and science with the fierceness of defending God in the past.

 

Whether you approve of God on the wane or not, the need for God isn’t the same as the need to create God. The latter serves a lower purpose, which is the mind’s need for constructs–stories, explanations, wishful thinking myths, consolations, and so on. The need for mental constructs rules everything we can think about or put into worlds. From this perspective, the creativity put into the God-construct has been enormously impressive. Think of the great cathedrals and religious painters in the Western tradition–they glorify magnificently the God-construct and yet amount to the tiniest fraction of the whole enterprise.

 

If every trace of God was wiped off the face of the earth, the need for God would remain. This attests to a simple fact: being human has an inexpressible dimension to it.  This inexpressible dimension cannot be put into words or concepts, and even when cathedrals are built around it, they are fragile symbols of the reality. There is no place where this dimension can be found, and no time when it will either come or go. To validate it only happens through inner experience, and even then the experience must be transcendent, going beyond words, concepts, symbols, and mental constructs.

 

The transcendent journey leads to the source of consciousness and therefore the source of reality. To say that one arrives at God is true only if you realize that the God in question isn’t anything like the God made out of human creativity. God is the immeasurable potential as consciousness for all forms of knowing and experience in every living organism. Our everyday reality is an experience in that consciousness. The real God is wholeness, which has no qualities we can speak of, including cherished qualities like mercy and compassion, and yet God is the source of all possible qualities. This disparity is one reason for the gap between our need to create God and our need for God as reality. Frustrated by not experiencing the reality, we fall back into the old, familiar game of mental constructs, and thus a new, provisional, incomplete, and dangerously factional version of God gets born.

 

Our greatest hope for the evolution of human consciousness is that we are finally ready to give up on all pseudo-Gods, not only for the incomparable violence and suffering they leave in their wake, but more importantly because God as reality awaits our awakening. What better hope for humanity is there?

Deepak Chopra MD, FACP, founder of The Chopra Foundation and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, is a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation, and is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Chopra is the author of more than 85 books translated into over 43 languages, including numerous New York Times bestsellers. His latest books are The Healing Self co-authored with Rudy Tanzi, Ph.D. and Quantum Healing (Revised and Updated): Exploring the Frontiers of Mind/Body Medicine.  www.deepakchopra.com

MORE

How to Really Be Yourself

 

By Deepak Chopra, MD

 

If you think about being yourself, what does that mean? If asked, “Do you like being who you are?” not everyone would say yes–some people dislike themselves. This can be the product of low self-esteem or perhaps a deep sense of guilt. Liking yourself doesn’t have to occur all the time, however. There are times when you behave in ways you aren’t proud of and say things you wish you could take back. Yet being yourself is more mysterious than like or dislike.

 

To be yourself, you have to know who you are. “I” isn’t simple and in many ways is very elusive. A two-year-old writing on the walls with crayon is being herself, and so is a middle-school bully tormenting a classmate on social media. Running wild, acting on your worst impulses, and flouting all the normal rules are behaviors worth suppressing. But if you are candid about yourself, such impulses exist inside you.

 

If you take a look at how your mind operates, you’ll quickly realize that many agendas compete for your attention. In certain situations you call upon a wide range of emotions that want to be expressed. You act differently at work than at home. Habit, memory, and old conditioning compete over your attention. These agendas have their own claims, and there has to be a decision-maker and overseer who chooses which persona to adopt, which feelings to suppress, which behavior is appropriate at any given moment.

 

Our sense of identity is assigned the task of sorting out and controlling these agendas, which means that being yourself, if we want “I” to be free and easy, could mean almost anything.  The domestic abuser who is a “model citizen,” works hard, and prides himself on being in control has multiple faces, and depending on which one is being allowed to behave freely, a man with these facts can be horrible or honorable at any particular time.

 

“I” is incredibly adroit at figuring out which agendas to hide from public sight, which leads to a wide gap between the social self and the private self. When it comes to primitive drives like sex and aggression, a person may even be afraid of himself, and then “I” becomes a kind of inner jailer who keeps the worst side of human nature from leaping out. With all of this complex business going on, “I” isn’t actually a person but more like a traffic manager, a process more than a self. As the poet Rumi asks, “Who am I in the middle of this thought traffic?”

 

At the very least, being yourself can’t be pinned down. To complicate matters further, “I” accumulates labels and tags to define who it is. If I am a senior citizen, male, a doctor, husband, father, and grandfather, Indian by birth American by nationality, and so on, these labels have a claim on me. I can present them to the world as me, while at another level “I” can’t really be defined by labels and tags. They come on and off like clothing, and if I get weighed down by a label, it becomes very hard to be myself. Instead, I will simply be letting the male or Indian or doctor out, playing the role defined by the label.

 

For all of that, something inside everyone says, “I just want to be myself.” This is the cry of a prisoner who craves freedom, but freedom from what? If I give up my tags and labels, I risk becoming a social outcast or a nobody. If I stop overseeing all those competing agendas inside my head, I might behave like an animal or go crazy. If I sit passively and do nothing, existence loses its meaning and purpose. But at least we can say that being yourself is the impulse to be free.

 

If you attempt to be free by setting “I’m” free, it won’t succeed. “I” or ego doesn’t exist beyond the functions we assign to it. “I” is a concept in the mind that has no real substance or essence. Take away its assigned functions and it doesn’t exist, as one can see in real life with babies, who are without ego at birth and gradually assemble one in their earliest years. Babies experience the world innocently, and they often seem to feel wonder and delight. No one would willingly return to infancy, but we’d like to be innocent again if it brought wonder, love, freshness, and renewal back into our lives.

 

What blocks innocence of experience is the burden of the self, with its lifelong disappointments, worries, frustration, ingrained habits, and pointless attitudes. Shedding the burden of the self isn’t something “I” can do; it’s beyond the ego’s job description. In fact–and here is the big twist in the plot–the self that yearns to be free is part of the burden of the self. Water cannot say “I don’t want to be wet” without self-contradiction. Likewise, the self cannot say “I want to get rid of the burden of the self,” because that burden is the self. Not just ego but anything you identify with, desire, reject, remember, anticipate. and feel is self-made for the purposes of substantiating your personal reality.

 

This is the agenda of agendas, to hold on to the stuff that floats through the mind and make it real. “I” am here to keep “me” real, and as long as that’s the agenda, there can be no freedom. This twist in the plot has been mulled over by the world’s wisdom traditions for many centuries. To be yourself, you need to find an escape route from “I” and the reality it constantly reinforces.  Such is the conclusion arrived at by every strain of spiritual teaching East and West. Dreams of Heaven, a return to Eden, Nirvana, enlightenment, unconditional love, divine grace, and perpetual bliss all express the same urge–to be free once and for all.

 

If the limited self, the ego personality and all its agendas, can’t achieve the goal of lasting freedom, there is only one alternative. Existence must have freedom built into it. Being free simply means Being. If existence is a trap instead, destined to imprison the mind because the mind has no hope of freedom, the whole spiritual rigmarole might as well be tossed away. Fortunately, each person can test the validity of lasting freedom by exploring what it means to be. Existence isn’t a flat, empty void. To be is to be fully conscious, which means that being conscious could be enough in order to attain lasting freedom. 

 

No one can assure you of this possibility from the outside. It must be tested personally, which implies a journey from limited consciousness to full consciousness. Now is always the right time to undertake such a journey. No one is going to deprive you of your share of existence and consciousness. The real question is whether you listen or not to the inner voice that cries, “I want to be myself.” Once you begin to listen, the journey to full consciousness takes care of itself.

 

Deepak Chopra MD, FACP, founder of The Chopra Foundation and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, is a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation, and is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Chopra is the author of more than 85 books translated into over 43 languages, including numerous New York Times bestsellers. His latest books are The Healing Self co-authored with Rudy Tanzi, Ph.D. and Quantum Healing (Revised and Updated): Exploring the Frontiers of Mind/Body Medicine.  www.deepakchopra.com

 

 

MORE

X